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This blog is where we announce new videos & talk about the power of explanation & the change it can create. 

How a Coin is Solving One of the World's Great Explanation Problems

I grew up playing soccer and over the past few years, Sachi and I have become bigger fans than ever, especially for our hometown Seattle Sounders.  The rules of soccer came pretty easily to Sachi who didn't play as a youngster - with one huge exception: the offsides rule.  I tried to point it out at matches, explain the idea, etc.  Eventually, visuals did the trick and now she's the one throwing her arms in the air.

Indeed, the offsides rule has a serious, worldwide explanation problem. It's adoption is limited by how the idea is being explained.  And looking forward to The 2012 Olympics in London, this is an explanation problem that's ripe for a solution.  

Enter Neil Wolfson, who won a competition to design a coin which was sport related for a series to celebrate the Olympics. According to Wolfson:

"I'm a football fan, I followed the Premier League since its inception and if I had 50p for every time someone had asked me to explain the offside rule I'd be a very rich man."
"When the coin is in circulation I hope people like it and I hope people are able to use it to explain the offside rule."

So, the coin is a visual aid meant to be used in concert with a verbal explanation.  Sounds familiar.  The real magic of this explanation though, is that it also buys beer.